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Recipes for dogs with kidney disease

Cooking for dogs – dogs with kidney disease can still be provided with a tasty and kidney supportive diet. With meat, carbohydrates, vegetables, oil and our Vitamin Optimix Renal you create a protein and phosphorus reduced diet which will relieve the kidneys.

Below you will find a kidney-friendly recipe, if only blood urea and creatinine are increased and a recipe for a stricter kidney diet, if additionally blood phosphate is increased.

Recipe suggestion for adult dogs with kidney disease (daily amount in gram) with increased blood urea and creatinine:

body weight (kg)

meat/fish (raw weight)

soft cooked carbohydrates

vegetables/ fruit

oils

Vitamin Optimix Renal*

2.5

55 - 65

30 - 35

20 - 25

0.8 - 1

1

5

90 - 110

45 - 56

35 - 45

1.5 - 2

2

10

150 - 185

80 - 95

60 - 75

2.5 - 3

3

20

255 - 310

130 - 160

100 - 125

4 - 5

5

30

345 - 420

175 - 215

135 - 170

5.5 - 7

6.5

40

430 - 525

220 - 270

170 - 210

7 - 8.5

8.5

50

510 - 620

260 - 315

200 - 245

8 - 10

10

60

580 - 710

300 - 360

230 - 280

10 - 12

11

70

655 - 800

335 - 410

260 - 315

11 - 13

13

*one measuring spoon (leveled) corresponds to approx. 3.0 g

Recipe suggestion for adult dogs with kidney disease (daily amount in gram) with increased blood urea, creatinine and phosphate:

body weight (kg)

meat/fish (raw weight)

soft cooked carbohydrates

vegetables/ fruit

oils

Vitamin Optimix Renal*

2.5

45 - 55

45 - 55

20 - 25

0.8 - 1

1

5

75 - 95

75 - 95

35 - 45

1.5 - 2

2

10

125 - 155

125 - 155

60 - 75

2.5 - 3

3

20

210 - 260

210 - 260

100 - 120

4 - 5

5

30

290 - 350

290 - 350

135 - 170

5.5 - 7

6.5

40

360 - 435

360 - 435

170 - 210

7 - 8.5

8

50

425 - 520

425 - 520

200 - 245

8 - 10

10

60

490 - 590

490 - 590

230 - 280

9 - 11

11

70

550 - 670

550 - 670

260 - 315

10 - 12.5

13

*one measuring spoon (leveled) corresponds to approx. 3.0 g

further information:

meat/fish:

The meat should be predominantly muscle meat with a high fat content, well suited here are goose, duck, chicken or turkey with skin, fatty portions of beef (e. g. minced meat, breast, short ribs), lamb or sheep. Cooked or fried pork is also suitable. If the exact fat content of the meat is known, you should use at least 15% fat content.

Once a week, a fatty fish such as salmon or mackerel are possible.

innards:

In kidney patients, only muscle meat should be used in the first 6-8 weeks. Later, after consultation, innards may be used to a maximum of 30% of the meat quantity (i.e. innards may replace the complete meat ration about twice a week) to ensure the supply of the essential amino acids. However, if a strict kidney diet is necessary, the innards should be completely omitted.

Acceptable innards are rumen, leaf tripe, spleen, heart, udder, lung and kidney. They do not necessarily have to be included in the ration. Innards have a higher connective tissue content compared to muscle meat, this can cause bloating and a soft stool when given in large amounts. 

Liver has a high content of vitamin A. The portion of fresh liver therefore should not exceed 0.5 g per kg of body weight per day (e. g. a 10 kg dog: 5 g of liver per day or 35 g a week).

Maw meat may have remains of thyroid which, when feeding large amounts regularly, may cause symptoms of hyperthyroidism.

bones:

In dogs with kidney disease, care needs to be taken with phosphorus. Since bones are rich in phosphorus, bone feeding should be avoided.

carbohydrates:

To keep the protein and phosphorus content of the diet as low as possible carbohydrates are an essential additional energy source.

Suitable carbohydrates such as potatoes, pasta or rice are high in starch, easily digestible and a readily available source of energy. To be properly utilized they must be cooked very soft (rule of thumb: cooked 15-20 minutes longer than for humans usually).

It is possible to mix it up, as long as the products and the daily change is well received. 

A good alternative is to give different types of flakes, such as potato or rice flakes. These should be soaked in approximately three times the amount of hot water before feeding them cooled down.100 g of cooked carbohydrates correspond to about 25-30 g of dried flakes. 

vegetables/fruit:

With a few exceptions, all types of vegetables and fruit can be given. They are a source of fiber and folic acid. It is essential to exclude the following varieties: onions, garlic, leeks, avocados, grapes and raisins. Instead of fresh vegetables or fruit you can also give flakes or canned vegetables. In case your dog refuses vegetables, the feeding of cellulose fibers may be useful to balance intestinal activity if their stool gets too soft. 

supplements:

  • oils: To cover the essential fatty acids we recommend thistle, hemp or sunflower oil and salmon oil. The daily amount should consist of ¾ of one of the vegetable oils and ¼ of salmon oil. Instead of salmon oil from the bottle you can use salmon oil capsules
  • Vitamin Optimix Renal supplies all necessary trace and volume elements as well as vitamins in a kidney-friendly way.

 

We hope this makes feeding your dog a lot more fun! If you have any questions or would like a customized recipe, we are here to help! Please note that questions by phone and email are chargeable after consultation.  

 

 

image credits: Fotolia.com, #191203141, © Soloviova Liudmyla

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